And…he’ll never be any good

The late 1950’s introduced us to the rule breaker or rebel of the school. The coolest and most popular kid around that everyone knew

Movies, music, leather jackets, and the smell of greasy hair bring back memories of a changing time, when teenagers saying what was on their minds came into existence.
This paved the road for the atmosphere of today where parents are your friends. Teachers and community leaders now offer open conversations with an age group that at one time just followed orders.

Thank a baby boomer today for freedom of expression!!! It’s been real…..

Advertisements

Old city offers new beginnings

 

I made a quick unexpected trip this week  to Reading Pennsylvania, located about one hour west of Philadelphia.   For many years the city has gone through changes from it’s early German influence to being a welcoming community of cultural diversity today.  With a full agenda on my three day visit I did squeeze in a break to get few photos, working around the rain, traffic and school buses.  Most folks will recognize the name from the “Reading Railroad” on the Monopoly game board.

 

Like its neighboring cities of Philadelphia and Baltimore the city favors a variety of styles of “row houses”.

 

As you make your way through the narrow one way streets there are reminders of the thriving past history of this city.

 

 

 

After admiring this very old city you may as well enjoy a cold beer from America’s oldest brewery with a soft pretzel, ring bologna, and maybe a slice of tomato pie…..

IMG_8873

For more information about the history of this city: https://www.readingpa.gov/content/history-reading

Reading is located off US route 422 and 5 miles from the Pennsylvania turnpike I76 take the Morgantown exit.

Happy travels 🙂 much  to see in the USA when you exit the interstates….

Christmas Time in a small town USA-Meldrim Georgia — EffinghamMoves

Some days you just need a break from the “busy-ness” of the season. Those are the times that it is so refreshing to visit a small town, where the calmness is soothing. I always expect that someone in the neighborhood will notice an unfamiliar car, so I never get a way without a good conversation […]

via Christmas Time in a small town USA-Meldrim Georgia — EffinghamMoves

Snow thankful ⛄️

163424_1632414663806_58542_n

I have a snow story  to share with all of you.  I moved away from my home in Buffalo, New York  many years ago.  My Mom and Dad would visit me in Savannah Georgia in the winter and I would visit them in New York  during the summer, all of us chasing after the perfect 70 degree weather.

I changed the routine up a bit one  February when my  Dad called and asked to speak with my youngest son.  This was not out of the ordinary  for him to call during football season since they always talked about their favorite team “The Buffalo Bills”, but the season was over.

My curiosity over this Sunday night called came to an end when my youngest
son looked over to me and said ” Grandpa wants us to come up this week because they have a lot of snow”.  I jumped into the conversation and my Dad said ” the kids have to get to know snow”.

Two days later along with my two sons I was on a windy cold flight to Buffalo.  The landing was so turbulent the passengers applauded the flight crew when we parked at the gate of the terminal.

My Dad was in his usual waiting area with hands full of coats, scarves, gloves and boots that my sisters gathered up for all of us to wear.
Dad and the boys had a great week sledding, ice fishing, skating and fun things kids do in the snow. I stayed inside with my feet on the floor registers trying to stay warm.
My Dad passed away soon after this visit but I’ve never really felt like he left us because there are so many memories like this one.
When I see  snow photos I can’t help to think that even when the snow melts the “snow prints” will leave big impressions.

Happy Thanksgiving friends……eat more than one piece of pie

The mystery of the history of the chair

chair

I would never want to seem ungrateful for a gift but this one has sort of become a nuisance.  My 90 year young father in law tagged this chair for me while prepping his home for an estate sale.  I’m really touched because I know how much it meant to him since my mother in law took such great care of it and it was passed on to them  from his mother.

As the story goes, the chair was from a brothel near the train depot in Laramie Wyoming in the 1800’s.  It somehow came into the family through an uncle that worked for the Union Pacific railway.  My father in law believes the brothel was located near the depot, since it was a common gathering place for the rail workers.

Anyway, it really doesn’t flow well with my decor.  My youngest daughter won’t  let my grandchildren sit on it, and my other daughter took it to her home for a brief period while I was downsizing and sent it back because she said it was creepy to look at.

I move it from one room to another and it never looks good.  If I have a guest who happens to sit in it and I tell them where it came from they usually jump right out of it.

I myself have never sat in it, although I’ve been curious to see if it would change my mood at times. 😉

I’ve googled brothels, chairs, Laramie , Laramie antiques and can’t find anything to match it up with.  My only conclusion so far is that it was either foyer or parlor furniture.  In that case to stay with tradition it will remain on my first floor.

If only chairs could talk, it would be a hoot to listen to this one