Augusta Cotton Exchange Building

Augusta Georgia

Designed by Enoch William Brown, the Augusta Cotton Exchange Building was constructed in the mid-1880s at the height of both the production and trade of cotton in Augusta. The ornate cast-iron entrance elements underneath the projecting round corner turret complement the vigorous brick and stone details of this significant High Victorian building.  The local foundry of Charles F. Lombard cast the iron columns for the entrance in 1886. Both Charles and his brother George R. Lombard had foundries and were well known and respected for the manufacture of ornamental iron

Augusta Cotton Exchange building-mid 1880’s

Designed by Enoch William Brown, the Augusta Cotton Exchange Building was constructed in the mid-1880s at the height of both the production and trade of cotton in Augusta. The ornate cast-iron entrance elements underneath the projecting round corner turret complement the vigorous brick and stone details of this significant High Victorian building.  The local foundry of Charles F. Lombard cast the iron columns for the entrance in 1886. Both Charles and his brother George R. Lombard had foundries and were well known and respected for the manufacture of ornamental iron“. To read more click here to visit the National Park Service

Augusta Cotton Exchange building
Side entry Augusta Cotton Exchange building
High Victorian Building in Augusta Georgia
National register of Historic Places building plate

At one time Augusta was a leading cotton exchange market in the world. Situated on the Savannah River 172 miles north of Savannah.

Savannah River Augusta riverwalk

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you are enjoying the sites of coastal Georgia and South Carolina.

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Thursday Doors

4 thoughts

  1. What a beautiful building. I love everything about it, the doors, of course, but the brick and iron work, the broad low arches over the windows, the white stone accents and the details along the roof.

    Thanks for sharing this with Thursday Doors.

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